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Business

DJ Khaled pockets $4.8 million for lavish Florida home



DJ Khaled is passing the key in Florida, where he just sold his waterfront home in the Miami suburb of Aventura for $4.8 million.

The deal wraps up a multiyear effort by the hip-hop mainstay, who first floated the house for sale at $7.999 million in 2018. The original listing came a few months after he dropped a whopping $21.75 million on a 12,750-square-foot minimalist mansion a few miles south in Miami Beach.

This one’s a bit smaller at 6,700 square feet, but it claims a double lot in gated Island Estates and boasts 240 feet of water frontage. The home itself is classic Khaled, as gold and crystal chandeliers crown dramatic common spaces with marble floors, arched doorways, stone columns and 30-foot ceilings.

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The foyer. 

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The living room. 

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The staircase. 

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The dining room. 

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The kitchen. 

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The office. 

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The master bedroom. 

(Realtor.com)

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The theater. 

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The exterior. 

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The pool. 

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The pool at night. 

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The fire pit. 

(Realtor.com)

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The hammock. 

(Realtor.com)

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The waterfront home. 

(Realtor.com)

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The front. 

(Realtor.com)

Two-story walls of glass line the living room, and the kitchen adds splashes of tile. There’s also a formal dining room, an office and a movie theater. The master suite, with plush purple accents, is one of five bedrooms. There are seven bathrooms.

A spiral staircase and elevator navigate the floor plan, which opens to multiple balconies and terraces overlooking the grounds. Out back, a cabana, swimming pool, spa and fire pit overlook the bay.

Khaled, 44, has released 11 studio albums including 2019’s “Father of Asahd.” A busy DJ, songwriter, producer and social media personality, he boasts collaborations with Rihanna, Justin Bieber, Drake and Kanye West and won a Grammy in 2020 for the song “Higher.”

He bought the property five years ago for $3.59 million, according to public records. Two years later, he dropped $9.9 million on a French Normandy-style spot in Mulholland Estates owned by singer-songwriter Robbie Williams.

Janet Ben Zvi of One Sotheby’s International Realty held the listing. Julian Johnston of the Corcoran Group represented the buyer.

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Business

Reddit moderators may finally be getting help in fighting hate



For years Jefferson Kelley watched hate bloom in his treasured online spaces.

When Kelley, a Reddit moderator, booted hateful users off threads where Black people discussed sensitive personal experiences, racial slurs piled up in his inbox. Crude remarks about women filled the comment sections under his favorite “Star Trek” GIFs. The proliferation of notorious forums, including one that perpetuated a vicious racist stereotype about Black fathers, stung Kelley, a Black father himself.

Kelley and other moderators repeatedly pleaded with the company to back them up and take stronger action against harassment and hate speech. But Reddit never quite came through.

Then, all of a sudden, that seemed to change. When Reddit announced last week it was shutting down a noxious pro-Trump group that had violated the site’s rules for years, Kelley could scarcely believe it.

Reddit’s move to overhaul content policy and ban some 2,000 subreddits, or forums, is one of the most sweeping enforcement actions the company has taken to date. To Kelley and other Black moderators, it was a sign that the company might finally begin real work to stem the flow of harassment and abuse they faced on a daily basis.

The bans — which coincided with a wave of aggressive moves by other large internet platforms including Facebook and YouTube — came after hundreds of Reddit moderators signed a letter urging the company to take racism seriously. It also followed the resignation this month of Alexis Ohanian, one of Reddit’s co-founders, from the company’s board of directors. Ohanian, who said he had been moved by the protests over the killing of George Floyd, asked that his board seat be filled by a black candidate.

Reddit and other tech companies have long been under fire for allowing false information and discriminatory ideologies to spread on their platforms, and for weak or inconsistent enforcement of policies against hate speech and harassment. Hesitant to provoke backlash from conservative critics and far-right agitators, leaders of these companies have often argued their platforms were neutral grounds akin to public spaces, and pointed to“free speech” values as reason for their inaction.

But the rapid approach of a presidential election amid a global pandemic and a nationwide movement over Floyd’s killing have engineered a tipping point in the tech industry. The math has changed, and tech platforms have seemingly, as one journalist quipped, “decided that the grief they’re getting for tolerating hate is more trouble than the grief they’d get for not tolerating hate.”

For moderators, who had spent years trying in vain to get the ear of Reddit’s corporate leaders, the effect of this sudden shift was as if the brick wall they’d been pushing on suddenly transformed into a swinging door.

When Kelley first started lurking on Reddit in 2014, he was there mostly for the “Star Trek” content. After several years participating enthusiastically in the r/StarTrekGIFs forum, he took charge of it, volunteering as an unpaid moderator in 2016. Reddit quickly became core to his social life. Kelley made GIFs and he made friends. He even started recording a podcast, “Beyond Trek,” with the people he met through the forum.

Kelley had always noticed the stream of hate on the platform, but when he began moderating the prominent Black People Twitter subreddit in 2017, the stream turned into a torrent.

Users mockingly labeled a Black student’s admission to Harvard Medical School an affirmative action case and promoted misleading, racist narratives about “black on black crime.”

The forum was supposed to provide respite from racism, so Kelley and its other moderators came up with new rules: Comments would initially be open to all, but if the bad faith remarks piled up, the thread would be put in “Country Club” mode, in which only users the moderators manually verified could comment. (The name is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the history of Black people being excluded from country clubs.)

Although this tactic succeeded in improving discourse in the forum, Kelley, as its moderator, paid a price. On an average day, he might receive 50 messages with the N-word or other racist sentiment. (With Black Lives Matters protests surging, that number has only increased, he said.)

In its outlines, his story resembles those of legions of other moderators who manage enormous communities on Reddit. Like Kelley, many joined the platform for friends and community only to become disillusioned.

In 2015, moderators shut down more than 265 subreddits in protest of the company’s firing of Victoria Taylor, a then-employee of Reddit who served as a useful resource to moderators. The revolt was a culmination of mounting frustration that the company did not appreciate their work or provide proper moderation tools. Company co-founder Ohanian responded at the time, acknowledging the situation was handled poorly and promising to address moderators’ concerns.

@TheYellowRose, a moderator of the subreddit r/blackladies, told the Atlantic she and her fellow “mods” were harassed in the wake of the 2014 Black Lives Matter protests in Ferguson, Mo. Her team wrote an open letter titled, “We have a racist user problem and Reddit won’t take action.” The letter, signed by mods overseeing dozens of subreddits, received no response.

Over the years, Reddit occasionally quarantined or banned handfuls of subreddits and tweaked its policies in response to public backlash. Overall, the changes failed to stem the flow of harassment.

It wasn’t even clear Reddit’s leadership considered that a goal. In 2018, when a user asked Reddit CEO Steve Huffman whether “obvious open racism, including slurs,” was against the company’s rules, Huffman said it wasn’t. (He added later that although racism was unwelcome, it wasn’t prohibited.)

It wasn’t until September 2019 that the company, in the course of banning a dozen white nationalist subreddits, explicitly banned harassment and bullying on the site.

When the Black Lives Matter movement succeeded in mobilizing millions of protesters following Floyd’s death, it unleashed pressure that had been building for years, pushing Reddit users who have been uncomfortable with the site’s culture for years to act for the first time and ushering executives to the table.

A moderator of the subreddit “Against Hate Subreddits,” @DubTeeDub, was angered by what he saw as hypocrisy in Huffman’s somber public note affirming support for Black Lives Matter. Huffman wrote: “We do not tolerate hate, racism, and violence, and while we have work to do to fight these on our platform, our values are clear.”

@DubTeeDub drafted a letter demanding change. Hundreds of moderators including Kelley signed the June 8 open letter to Huffman and Reddit’s board. Within a day of publishing, @DubTeeDub received a message from @ggAlex, who introduced himself as Alex Le, the company’s vice president of product.

The introduction led to @DubTeeDub and other moderators of r/AgainstHateSubreddits’s being invited to a series of Zoom videoconference calls with Reddit‘s paid administrators and executives. The sessions were presented as part of the company’s outreach to moderators fighting hate, Black users and other marginalized groups.

The response to the letter was notable because communities one wouldn’t normally expect to offer support, did, said J. Nathan Matias, an assistant professor at Cornell studying digital governance and behavior. “The music discussion community, the relationship advice community, the community for talking about swimming — you wouldn’t normally see communities like that as focused on social change,” he said, “so it’s actually a big deal.”

In 2015, when Reddit banned an offensive fat-shaming subreddit, the outcries of censorship by various communities was swift and intense. The front page of Reddit, which features the site’s most-engaged-with content, was plastered nonstop with posts decrying the banning; hundreds of imitation “Fat People Hate” subreddits popped up; users posted private information about Reddit admins who helped carry out enforcement.

But it’s clear the culture has changed drastically since then, @DubTeeDub said. “People are getting very tired of being associated with a website that has such a dominating hateful ideology,” he said.

Kelley is part of the shift: Although he has always fought hard to make his own Reddit communities hate-free, Kelley said he had never before devoted much time to broader internal efforts.

Kelley joined several of the Zoom calls with Reddit administrators and executives. He’s accumulated a laundry list of ideas for how the company can better support moderators, based on his own experience. One suggestion: erecting more obstacles for users who message mods. It’s not uncommon for someone to create six different Reddit accounts in order to spam a moderator’s inbox over and over. An extra identity-verification step might weed out people acting in bad faith, he said.

The “Black Fathers” subreddit provides a glaring example of Reddit’s inaction on racism over the years. The name suggests a space filled with posts by Black men attempting to do their daughters’ hair and other similarly wholesome content, Kelley said. But, in fact, the subreddit was meant as one big racist joke based on the stereotype of absent Black fathers. The moderators who created the subreddit many years ago restricted posting so that the only visible message was, “There doesn’t seem to be anything here.”

r/BlackFathers remained on the site for years. The company quarantined the group in 2015 but didn’t go as far as banning it until 15 days ago.

When asked about prolonged inaction on subreddits such as r/BlackFathers, Reddit pointed to a statement by Huffman.

He said that although the company had gotten better at scaling enforcement efforts and measurably reducing hateful experiences year over year, “[u]ltimately, it’s our responsibility to support our communities by taking stronger action against those who try to weaponize parts of Reddit against other people.”

Reddit is not the only internet platform rethinking its responsibility to regulate content.

In late May, Twitter slapped warning labels on tweets by Trump that made false claims or glorified violence toward protesters, becoming the first company to challenge his pattern of lying and bullying via social media. On June 3, Snapchat said it would no longer promote Trump’s account in the “Discover” tab of the app. On June 18, Facebook removed dozens of ads placed by Trump’s reelection campaign for using Nazi imagery, and a week later the company said it would label or remove politicians’ tweets when they violated rules — including tweets posted by Trump.

Then, on the same day as Reddit handed down its bans, Amazon-owned streaming service Twitch temporarily suspended Trump’s channel over “hateful conduct,” and YouTube banned half a dozen prominent white supremacist channels, including those of David Duke and Richard Spencer.

Experts say the changes sweeping the industry have likely been triggered by a confluence of advertisers threatening to pull their ad dollars from big companies, negative press, internal pressure by employees, and diminishing public goodwill.

“When you have high-profile current events, all of these levers can be pulled, which enables more significant, drastic changes,” said Kat Lo, a researcher who studies online content moderation at the nonprofit Meedan.

Even with the broader climate finally stacked in their favor, some Reddit moderators are skeptical company executives will follow through on their promises to proactively create a more welcoming space.

The company’s history offers plenty of fodder to those who suspect its current show of interest is little more than lip service. Adrienne Massanari, an assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago who studies new media and digital cultures, said Reddit hurt its credibility by giving r/the_donald so many second chances, “more than it ever should have gotten.”

Still, Kelley is optimistic. “Things don’t change overnight,” he said.

Last week, he put in a request to take over the banned r/BlackFathers. A father to three young children, he wants to reclaim it and turn it into a supportive space for people like himself. A Reddit admin he met on one of the Zoom calls assured him he would be handed the reins.

He’s not sure how long it will be before the company gives him access, but he doesn’t mind the wait. It gives him time to reach out to folks he trusts to join the mod team, and help shape the future of the community.

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Business

Hot Property: John Stamos sells romantic retreat



One year and three price cuts later, actor John Stamos has finally sold his longtime home in the Beverly Hills Post Office area. The French Country-style estate just traded hands for $4.24 million, records show.

That’s about 37% shy of his asking price last summer, but still a nice improvement upon the $3.57 million the “Full House” star paid back in 2005. The sale comes about a year after he picked up a Cape Cod-style spot in Hidden Hills for $5.75 million.

There’s plenty of privacy, as the property is perched on a knoll behind a private gated street and a private gated driveway. Inside, the grounds feature a romantic 1950s home surrounded by gardens, fountains and lush landscaping.

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

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John Stamos’ Beverly Hills area home 

(Realtor.com)

Beamed ceilings top hardwood floors in the living spaces, which include a dining area, sky-lit chef’s kitchen and great room with a dramatic stone fireplace. Four bedrooms and four bathrooms complete the 3,500-square-foot interior.

French doors open outside, where a stone patio takes in sweeping city and mountain views. A swimming pool and a guesthouse, currently used as a music room, complete the property.

In addition to “Full House,” Stamos, 56, has starred in “General Hospital,” “ER” and “You.” He also recently reprised his role as Uncle Jesse in Netflix’s “Fuller House,” which he also executive produced.

During the ’90s, he owned a Mediterranean mansion on six acres in Calabasas before selling it for $2.15 million in 2001. The property recently went back up for sale at $4.1 million.

Aileen Comora and Paul Lester of the Agency held the listing. Thomas Davila of Compass represented the buyer.

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Business

Hot Property: Former MGM CEO Gary Barber lists Westside penthouse



Former MGM Chief Executive Gary Barber, who last year launched the new content company Spyglass Media Group, has put a two-story penthouse in Westwood on the market for $6.495 million.

Owned by the studio head for nearly two decades, the Remington condominium is tailored for art patrons with its high ceilings, gallery walls and wealth of custom lighting. Nearly 4,300 square feet of space hold a two-story living room, a dining room and an office/den. In the eat-in kitchen, sliding doors open to city views in two directions.

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The two-story living room. 

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The dining room. 

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Another view of the living room. 

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The office/den. 

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One of multiple outdoor balconies. 

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The kitchen. 

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The view from above. 

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The upstairs walkway. 

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The master suite. 

(Realtor.com)

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The master bath. 

(Realtor.com)

The master suite is upstairs and expands to include three closets and two bathrooms. There are four bedrooms and five bathrooms in all.

The 24-story Remington building, built in 2000, features private elevator access to each of its 93 units. Complex amenities include a library, wine storage, a heated lap pool and an English garden.

Barber bought the residence in 2003 for about $3.5 million, records show.

The South African-born film producer co-founded, with Roger Birnbaum, Spyglass Entertainment in the late 1990s before taking over as co-chairman and CEO of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 2010. His new venture, for which he serves as chairman and CEO, took its name from the former production company and was created last year in partnership with Lantern Entertainment, which previously acquired the assets of the defunct Weinstein Co.

Stephen Apelian and Joyce Rey of Coldwell Banker Realty hold the listing.

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Business

Caltech and the eugenics legacy of Robert Millikan



To the ever lengthening list of institutions facing a reckoning with their racist pasts, add the California Institute of Technology.

A petition calling for the removal of the name of Robert A. Millikan from buildings, programs and open spaces on the Pasadena campus has gathered 862 signatures since June 28, according to its originator, Michael Chwe, who received his bachelor’s degree in economics from Caltech in 1985 and is now a professor of political science at UCLA. The signatories include 51 faculty members and 448 alumni.

The organizers aim to force Caltech to recognize Millikan’s role in promoting the openly racist doctrine of eugenics and policies of forced sterilization and segregation in schools and housing.

Robert Millikan is the patron saint of Caltech.

Michael Chwe, sponsor of a petition to remove Millikan’s name from the Caltech campus

“He was not a bit player, but an important operative in this campaign,” says Anthony M. Platt, a scholar at UC Berkeley who has studied Millikan’s role as a leader of the Human Betterment Foundation, a group of wealthy and distinguished Californians whose advocacy of eugenics and forced sterilization influenced Nazi policies in the 1930s and 1940s.

The petition’s goals could produce an earth-shaking reassessment of Caltech’s self-image. Few historical figures occupy as revered a stature as Millikan does at Caltech. He is typically given credit for starting the conversion of the provincial Throop University into the global research powerhouse it is today.

Yet other similarly august figures have been or are being dethroned by their institutions. Perhaps most notable is the removal by Princeton of the name of Woodrow Wilson from a residential college and its public policy school. That’s in belated acknowledgement of Wilson’s uncompromising racism as president of Princeton, where he refused to admit any Black students, and as U.S. president, when he resegregated a federal civil service that had already become integrated.

Caltech is gingerly taking note of the movement to remove Millikan’s name. “We take seriously the concerns raised by members of our community on this matter,” Shayna Chabner, the university’s chief communications officer, told me by email.

Among its steps is “establishing a task force that is representative of Caltech’s community — including trustees, alumni, students, faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and staff — to study and advise on Caltech’s policy for naming buildings on campus: past, present, and future.”

Millikan was Caltech’s first Nobel laureate — in physics in 1923, for establishing the elementary charge of the electron — and served as its president (technically chairman of the executive council) for 24 years, longer than anyone else.

His name adorns buildings, rooms and spaces across the campus; the nose on his bust overlooking a campus walkway has been worn to a bronze luster by generations of students rubbing it for luck before taking their exams.

During his reign at Caltech, from 1921-45, Millikan was one of the best known and most respected scientists in the country. Simultaneously, he was helping to steer the Human Betterment Foundation, which tarnishes a legacy that extends well beyond Caltech — Millikan’s name adorns streets and public schools across the Southland.

The Human Betterment Foundation was the brainchild of Ezra S. Gosney, who had settled in Pasadena with a fortune from farming and real estate and established the organization in 1929. The group’s membership roll guaranteed it a wide influence.

It included Rufus von KleinSmid, then the president of USC, Lewis Terman, a Stanford psychologist who pioneered the study of IQ, and Harry Chandler, the publisher of the Los Angeles Times.

(The petition also calls for renaming Caltech’s Gosney Research Fund and Harry Chandler Dining Hall, among other facilities.)

Under Chandler’s leadership, according to Alexandra Minna Stern, a historian of eugenics, from 1935-41 The Times published a weekly column titled “Social Eugenics” by one Fred Hogue, a eugenics enthusiast. In one 1936 column Hogue praised “the movement in Germany and other Nordic countries of Europe for the elimination of reproduction of the unfit.”

Millikan was not a charter member of the Human Betterment Foundation, but joined its board in 1937. His views on race and women were no secret — indeed, they were excused by Caltech faculty member David Goodstein in a 2001 defense of Millikan against old charges of academic fraud as “typical at the time of a man of his upbringing and background.”

Goodstein acknowledged that Millikan in 1936 advised Duke University not to hire a female professor of physics because there were no outstanding female physicists in the U.S.

Writing his wife from Germany around the same time, he described physicist Paul Ehrenfest as “a Polish or Hungarian Jew” whose “suavity and ingratiating manner are a bit Hebraic (unfortunately) and to be fair, perhaps I ought to say too that his genial openmindedness, extraordinarily quick perception and air of universal interest are also characteristic of his race.”

The purported science of eugenics blanketed the world in the 1920s and 1930s. Its American manifestation, Platt observes, was noxiously right-wing, aimed not merely at promoting procreation among the ostensible elites — that is, wealthy and white — but the suppression of procreation by groups deemed to be undesirable.

The notion reached as high as the U.S. Supreme Court and the notorious 1927 decision by Oliver Wendell Holmes in the case of Buck vs. Bell, in which Holmes upheld Virginia’s forced sterilization law by referring to the Buck family, which was Black, as a hive of “degenerate offspring” and declaring, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.” In fact the Buck women were of normal intelligence but were sterilized without their knowledge.

American eugenicists found common cause with the emerging Nazi regime in Germany. In a 1934 article, Paul Popenoe, a lead researcher for the Human Betterment Foundation, saluted Adolf Hitler and the Nazis for their determination to achieve “national regeneration” by applying “biological principles to human society.”

Popenoe quoted liberally from Hitler’s “Mein Kampf,” including his admonition that “to prevent defective persons from producing equally defective offspring, is an act dictated by the clearest light of reason…. the most human act of mankind.”

Popenoe reproduced the Nazi sterilization law in its entirety and observed that while the law “may be considered better than the sterilization laws of most American states, the success…depends on conservative, sympathetic, and intelligent administration. Apparently the Nazis are doing their best to prevent criticism on this score.”

The Human Betterment Foundation discerned only good things from forced sterilization in California.

(Library of Congress)

Throughout the 1930s, Stern found, “California and German eugenicists traded ideas…and complimented each other’s escalating sterilization programs.” California, indeed, was a leader in the American sterilization movement.

Its forced sterilization law, enacted in 1909, was one of the first in the nation, and by 1938 its more than 12,000 involuntary sterilizations accounted for nearly half of all those nationwide. By 1979, when the state law was repealed, some 20,000 sterilizations had been performed.

Notes Platt: “Nazi racial scientists were excited to find supporters and endorsers in the U.S., and the foundation was excited that they were getting praise from a Western European country.”

During Millikan’s tenure at Caltech, Platt reports, a quota existed allowing for the appointment of only one Jewish full-time faculty member per year.

Perhaps most tellingly, Millikan oversaw the acquisition of the Human Betterment Foundation archives and its financial assets for Caltech after Gosney’s death in 1942. The terms accepted by Caltech called for the income from Caltech’s resulting Gosney Research Fund to be “de-voted in perpetuity to the promotion of research into the biological bases of human qualities.”

The names of members and trustees of the Human Betterment Foundation have been relegated to the trash heap by their institutions. USC last month removed Von KleinSmid’s name and bust from a central building on its downtown Los Angeles campus.

The Palo Alto school district has voted to take Terman’s name off a middle school. Pasadena’s Polytechnic School has removed Gosney’s name from a hallway named for him, and its Neighborhood Unitarian Universalist Church, which Millikan co-founded, last year removed his name from a room in its building.

Is Caltech up to the task of confronting the past of its revered figure? The action may be inescapable, but it may not be easy.

“Robert Millikan is the patron saint of Caltech,” Chwe acknowledges, though he says that younger faculty members and undergraduates seem to be less invested in continuing to honor him than others.

Platt argues that a reconsideration of Millikan and the institution’s links to the eugenics movement is long overdue. It missed a chance to do so in 1942, “when they took over the papers of the Human Betterment Foundation without questioning what it stood for.”

Even after World War II, when the consequences of the Nazi embrace of eugenics were well known, “there was no reflection at Caltech of what Millikan had participated in.” That time may have come.

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Business

Hot Property: MedMen’s Andrew Modlin lists L.A. home for $12 million



MedMen co-founder and president Andrew Modlin has put his home in the Hollywood Hills West area up for sale at $11.95 million.

The subdued contemporary sits behind walls on about a fifth of an acre in the celebrity-populated Bird Streets neighborhood.

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The front walkway. 

(Joel Danto Photography)

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An outdoor sitting room. 

(Joel Danto Photography)

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The outdoor fireplace. 

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The living and dining areas. 

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The kitchen. 

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The kitchen. 

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The master suite. 

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A view from the second story. 

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The master bathroom. 

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A bedroom. 

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A bathroom. 

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The office/den. 

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A bathroom. 

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The floating staircase. 

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The wine cellar and game room. 

(Joel Danto Photography)

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The game room. 

(Joel Danto Photography)

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The gym. 

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The swimming pool and spa. 

(Joel Danto Photography)

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The second-story patio. 

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The pool. 

(Joel Danto Photography)

The 6,377-square-foot house has five bedrooms, seven bathrooms, linen-finished limestone floors and a wine cellar set behind glass. An upper terrace holds a swimming pool with a spa. Views from the second story take in the city lights.

Modlin bought the property last year through a trust for $11 million, records show. Earlier this year, he sold another house in West Hollywood to YouTube personality Emma Chamberlain for $3.4 million.

The cannabis entrepreneur co-founded MedMen in 2010 with Adam Bierman. The marijuana start-up has locations in New York, Nevada, Arizona, Illinois, Florida and California, including seven dispensaries in Los Angeles County.

Lindsay Guttman of the Agency holds the listing.

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Business

Hot Property: Christian ‘Bloodshy’ Karlsson buys Midcentury gem



It didn’t take long for this Midcentury gem to dazzle a buyer. The Pasadena home recently sold to Grammy-winning DJ Christian Karlsson for $2.385 million after roughly two weeks on the market.

Karlsson, who performs as Bloodshy in the prolific production duo Bloodshy & Avant, must’ve liked what he saw. Records show the Swedish native paid roughly $200,000 more than the asking price.

There’s plenty to like. The estate spans nearly an acre and centers on a low-slung 1960s home by architect John Galbraith. Clean lines and lush landscaping draw the eye to the pergola entry, and a vibrant teal front door flanked by 9-foot walls of glass accesses the home.

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The living room. 

(Realtor.com)

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The redwood panels. 

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The wet bar. 

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The kitchen. 

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The master bedroom. 

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The pool. 

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The single-story home. 

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The entry. 

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The exterior. 

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The yard. 

(Realtor.com)

Black slate floors mix with redwood panels in the living spaces, which include a stylish mahogany kitchen and a dining area with a wet bar. At the center of it all, a dual-sided stone fireplace runs floor to ceiling.

Three bedrooms, four bathrooms and workshop complete the 3,567-square-foot floor plan. The master suite opens to the backyard, where a swimming pool with a slide takes in mountain views. A patio, lawn and orchard complete the scene.

Active since the turn of the century, Karlsson is best known for his work in the acts Bloodshy & Avant, Miike Snow, Galantis and the artist collective/record label INGRID. He won a Grammy for producing Britney Spears’ hit “Toxic,” and he’s collaborated with pop stars such as Madonna, Jennifer Lopez, Katy Perry and Sky Ferreira.

Jane Workman and Margaret Nader of Deasy Penner Podley held the listing. Johnny Johnston of Compass represented Karlsson.

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Business

Hot Property: MGM’s Barry Poznick’s Manhattan Beach home for sale



TV producer Barry Poznick — the MGM Studios exec whose credits include “Beat Shazam” and “Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader?” — has listed his Manhattan Beach home for sale at $5.899 million.

That’s about $1.7 million more than he paid in 2014, real estate records show.

Poznick has been busy in that area this year, buying a bigger house nine streets over for $6.75 million in April and selling his beachfront condo in Playa del Rey to Lakers owner Jeanie Buss for $2.6 million in January.

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The living room. 

(Realtor.com)

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The open floor plan. 

(Realtor.com)

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The kitchen. 

(Realtor.com)

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The master bedroom. 

(Realtor.com)

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The master bathroom. 

(Realtor.com)

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The office. 

(Realtor.com)

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The deck. 

(Realtor.com)

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The guest bedroom. 

(Realtor.com)

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The patio. 

(Realtor.com)

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The exterior. 

(Realtor.com)

Set three blocks from the beach, this one spans just over 4,000 square feet and draws the eye with an exterior of wood shingles and white finishes. A flagstone patio is next to the home, which opens to a bright open floor plan with a great room and tiled kitchen.

Four bedrooms fill out the second level, and up top, the master suite has sliding farmhouse doors, vaulted ceilings, a fireplace and spa bathroom that opens to a private terrace. On the other side of the home, an office with built-ins expands to a larger deck with ocean views.

Jane Sager of Re/Max Estate Properties has the listing.

After joining MGM Studios in 2016, Poznick was named the company’s president of unscripted and alternative television last year. As a producer, his recent credits include “Meet the Frasers, “TKO: Total Knock Out” and “Signed.”

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Business

Hot Property: Matthew Perry relists L.A. penthouse for $27 million



Finding no takers last year at $35 million, actor Matthew Perry of “Friends” is relisting his penthouse in Century City for $27 million.

Located within the Century high-rise, the full-floor residence was reimagined during Perry’s ownership by architect Scott Joyce and interior designer LM Pagano.

Subdued colors, textured accents and modern fixtures dominate the 9,300-square-foot floor plan. Four private terraces take in views from every direction.

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The full-floor penthouse of actor Matthew Perry features four terraces, an oversized living room and a plush screening room. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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The expansive living room in the 9,300-square-foot home. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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The living room takes in city-lights views at night. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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A view of the living room. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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The game room. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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The kitchen and breakfast area.  

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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There’s space to stretch out in the screening room.  

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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A view of the screening room and Century City lights. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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Floor-to-ceiling windows in the master suite. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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The suite centers on the cityscape. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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The master suite. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

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The property includes four terraces. 

(Michael McNamara / Jason Speth)

An open-concept living room, center-island kitchen and custom screening room are among the living spaces. Four bedrooms include an expanded master suite outfitted with dual bathrooms, walk-in closets and a plush sitting area.

The 140-unit Century building, designed by Robert A.M. Stern, was completed in 2009. Concierge and security services, a fitness studio, a swimming pool and four acres of gardens and walking paths are among community amenities. Three covered parking spaces are included with Perry’s unit.

Perry, 50, has kept busy since his days playing Chandler Bing, appearing on the shows “Mr. Sunshine,” “The Good Wife” and “The Odd Couple.” He also played Edward M. Kennedy on the television miniseries “The Kennedys After Camelot.”

He bought the penthouse three years ago for $20 million, The Times previously reported.

Greg Holcomb and Cassandra Petersen of Compass hold the listing.

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Business

Reopening L.A. economy improved mental health, but coronavirus fears persist, survey finds



More Los Angeles County residents are leaving their homes and venturing back into public life as the economy reopens, prompting a reduction in psychological distress but heightening anxiety that reopening is occurring too quickly and could cause serious new coronavirus outbreaks, according to a new survey.

The results of a survey by the USC Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research and analyzed by L.A. County officials were revealed Monday by Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer amid a major increase in new coronavirus cases and hospitalizations tied to the reopening of businesses and people getting back to old routines, such as private gatherings, without wearing masks or keeping distance from people.

In mid-April, nearly 86% of L.A. County residents said they stayed home at all times except for essential activities or exercise; by the last week of June, only 58% said they were doing so.

Percent of L.A. County residents who stayed home except for essential activities and exercise.

(Los Angeles County)

More L.A. County residents are also having close contact — being in a distance within 6 feet — with people outside their household. In mid-April, only about 31% of L.A. County residents had such close contact with people outside of their household; by the last week of June, 55% were doing so.

Percent of L.A. County residents who had close contact with people outside of their household.

(Los Angeles County)

As the reopening has accelerated, however, fewer L.A. County residents are reporting a fear of running out of food because of a lack of money or other resources. In early April, 30% of L.A. County residents surveyed were worried about running out of food; that figure fell to roughly 11% for the last week of June.

Percent of L.A. County residents worried about running out of food because of a lack of money.

(Los Angeles County)

Additionally, fewer L.A. County residents are now reporting psychological distress as the reopening accelerated. In early April, 47% of surveyed county residents reported mild, moderate or severe symptoms of psychological distress; as the reopening accelerated, 36% reporting feeling such symptoms.

Percent of L.A. County residents with symptoms of psychological distress.

(Los Angeles County)

There was also a slight reduction in the percent of L.A. County residents who reported the pandemic posed a moderate or substantial threat to their household finances; 64% said it did so in mid-May; 56% said it did so in mid-June.

Percent of L.A. County residents who reported the coronavirus pandemic posed a threat to their household finances.

(Los Angeles County)

“This is the good news about opening — it’s that in fact, for many people, it’s provided some very important and much needed relief,” Ferrer said.

But as people have returned to physical work locations, workplaces have increasingly become sites of exposure to the highly contagious virus. While in early May, 37% of surveyed L.A. County residents said their job required them to come within 6 feet of other people regularly, 43% said they had to do so in mid-June.

L.A. County residents whose jobs require close contact.

(Los Angeles County)

More L.A. County residents are increasingly concerned that California is lifting restrictions on public activity due to the pandemic too quickly, the survey found. While 75% of survey respondents expressed such worry in early May, 79% did so in mid-June.

Ferrer said it’s obvious that people fed up with the stay-at-home order and wanting to return to a pre-pandemic way of life are a big reason behind the increased spread of disease.

“It’s clear that after months of quarantine, combined with the reopening of many sectors in the span of several weeks, we’ve had a lot of people disregard the very practices that allowed us to slow the spread,” Ferrer said. “Our inability to follow the most basic infection control and distancing directives leads to serious illness, and even the death of the people we love.”

Ferrer said she understands that “everyone is extraordinarily tired and they’re tired of having to deal with this virus.” But she added that “the sooner we get back to creating a new normal” — avoiding crowds, confined spaces, close contact; and always wearing masks and staying physically distant from those not in our household — the sooner we can return to school and work and seeing friends and family.